Writings

The writings on this site is split in several categories, but they’re all listed here together, chronologically, newest first.

The categories are Articles, Blog posts, Venetian Stories (newsletters), Lists and translations from Curiosità Veneziane.

  • Feast and Celebrations in Venice

    Feast and Celebrations in Venice

    The calendar of feasts and celebrations in Venice was full of events which are now largely forgotten.

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  • Scuole Grandi

    Scuole Grandi

    The Scuole Grandi — or the Great Schools — were Venetian medieval charities which due to their wealth became important institutions

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  • The Venetian constitution

    The Venetian constitution

    The constitution of the Republic of Venice never really existed. The Venetian nobility just made it up as they went.

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  • Chronology of major Venetian state institutions

    Chronology of major Venetian state institutions

    The Venetian state was always an ad hoc construct, and institutions came and went at the convenience of the ruling elite.

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  • Superintendents for the avoidance of superfluous expenses

    Superintendents for the avoidance of superfluous expenses

    The Republic of Venice had a magistracy of “Superintendents and regulators for the avoidance and regulation of superfluous expenses.”

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  • Quarantine in the 1600s

    Quarantine in the 1600s

    Quarantine was the main method of prevention of the black plague in Venice, and the lazzaretti served that purpose.

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  • The ASV Indice by Andrea da Mosto

    The ASV Indice by Andrea da Mosto

    The L’Archivio di Stato di Venezia : indice generale, storico, descrittivo ed analitico (shortened ASV Indice) by Andrea da Mosto is a very useful reference to all the major and minor institutions and offices of the Republic of Venice.

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  • Venetian Patent law — 1474

    Venetian Patent law — 1474

    The first patent law ever was Venetian, issued by the Pregadi (Senate) on March 19th, 1474.

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  • State institutions of the Republic of Venice

    State institutions of the Republic of Venice

    The Republic of Venice changed continuously as conditions inside and outside of it changed, until it gradually found its final form in the 1300s and 1400s.

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  • The Dizionario del Dialetto Veneziano by Giuseppe Boerio

    The Dizionario del Dialetto Veneziano by Giuseppe Boerio

    The Dizionario del Dialetto Veneziano by Giuseppe Boerio from 1829 is the essential dictionary of the late Venetian language for anybody trying to read old Venetian texts.

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  • Però l’anderà parte — vadit pars

    Però l’anderà parte — vadit pars

    Legal texts from the Republic of Venice often contains some particular Venetian idioms, such as “però l’anderà parte” and “vadit pars”

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  • Fornicators of Nuns

    Fornicators of Nuns

    “Fornicators of Nuns” were criminals in ancient Venice, and harshly punished, but that didn’t stop nuns from having lovers.

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  • The Lessico Veneto by Fabio Mutinelli

    The Lessico Veneto by Fabio Mutinelli

    The Lessico Veneto — Lexicon of the Veneto — by Fabio Mutinelli from 1851 is another of those must-have books for anybody interested in Venetian history, which is exact why it was written.

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  • Prostitution in Venice

    Prostitution in Venice

    In ancient Venice prostitution was considered a necessary evil, where more harm would come from a ban than from a de facto acceptance

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  • Archaeological digs in St. Mark’s square

    Archaeological digs in St. Mark’s square

    Archaeological digs in the Piazza San Marco have uncovered parts of the ancient church of San Giminiano and a grave of four persons

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  • The Legend of the Fisherman

    The Legend of the Fisherman

    The Legend of the Fisherman was part of the national narrative of the Venetian Republic, but it is now largely forgotten.

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  • Miniatures by Rosalba Carriera

    Miniatures by Rosalba Carriera

    Rosalba Carriera, the most popular and famous Venetian artist of the early 1700s, painted lots of miniatures.

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  • A Venetian Law

    A Venetian Law

    Ignorance of the law is no excuse — so the Serenissima sometimes published laws on inscriptions around the city.

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  • Scuole piccole

    Scuole piccole

    The ancient Venetians used the word scola or scuola to mean a guild, a confraternity or a charity. The scuole were generally not educational institutions.

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  • Churches in Venice

    Churches in Venice

    List of all churches Venice — consecrated, deconsecrated and demolished.

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